Compassion Manifesto reading, March 19, 2015

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The Compassion Manifesto was created as a spoken word project intended to create dialogue in the Abe Rogatnick Media Gallery, Emily Carr University. The reading of the Manifesto took place on March 19, and readers included Maria Lantin, Alex Philips and Julie Andreyev.

The Compassion Manifesto draws attention to our relations with nonhuman beings, and specifically within an art + design university, it responds to the growing interest by students to create work about, and sometimes with, nonhuman beings. The Manifesto draws attention to harmful anthropocentric modes, and advocates that we “feel our way” towards a more just and caring culture. This Manifesto is influenced by critical animal studies, ethics of care, Buddhism, vegan practices, and indigenous cultures.

discussion

Below are the slides shown in the reading that represent the text of the Manifesto. 

photo above courtesy of Carson Au

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About author
Julie Andreyev is an artist whose recent area of practice called Animal Lover, www.animallover.ca, explores animal creativity and communication through modes of interspecies collaboration and multi-species technologies. Her work has been shown around the world, and is supported by The Canada Council for the Arts, and The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. She is Associate Professor at Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver, and leads on the research project Wild Empathy.
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